September 9, 2019 | by Alexian Chiavegato

Ad Tech Weekly Roundup

A look at how last week’s news affects mobile publishers…

Google’s Proposed Privacy Standards Are Also Friendly for Programmatic Advertising
Tracking technology used by advertisers has enabled marketers to personalize ads to mobile and web users. Additionally, this method of advertising has generated companies like Google and Facebook a high return on investment, equaling enormous amounts of revenue each quarter. Google’s new “Privacy Sandbox” for Google Chrome makes an effort to maintain the privacy of users browsing the web while making great efforts to keep advertisers and publishers happy. To do this effectively, the new privacy standards modifies the tracking information that can be sent to advertisers.

The full explanation on Google’s blog makes it clear that Google is not trying to stop cookie tracking or the method of grouping users by interests to serve personalized ads. Google describes the Privacy Sandbox as a “secure environment for personalization.” One method that Google is blocking is known as fingerprinting, where advertisers access certain information about a users’ device like what software they are using and fonts on their device. Google also said they will use artificial intelligence to make programmatic more effective and less invasive for the user.

Apple Said To Balk At Creating New Privacy Standards With An Industry Trade Body
Interactive Advertising Bureau Tech Lab’s Jordan Mitchell has come up with a new method for tracking users on the internet, one that would put users in the drivers’ seat in regards to protecting their privacy. “Look, if a consumer wants to be a ghost, they should be able to be a ghost,” says Mitchell, senior VP of membership and operations at the IAB Tech Lab. “There is only one way to allow that, and it’s by providing the consumer with that choice and having the infrastructure, accountability and compliance behind it to make sure that is the case.”

The IAB has been looking to empower consumers but one major obstacle in doing that is to get the major browsers to work together and create one standard. He stated that Apple isn’t interested in collaborating. “They historically have shown that they don’t play well with others,” Mitchell says, in regards to Apple working with the IAB, he also remarked on the way cookies are used “should be according to the consumer, and not according to Apple.”

Facebook Watch Signs Video Partnerships With News Publishers in Europe
Facebook Watch announced video partnerships with France’s Le Monde, Germany’s Axel Springer and Sweden’s Expressen, in addition to other publishers in the European region. The partnership is air original video content and expand their presence globally.

“The internet has fundamentally changed how news publishers reach their audiences. We know that shows by established publishers resonate with people on Watch,” Jesper Doub, director of news partnerships for the EMEA region.
Some of the German shows set to air on Facebook Watch includes “Bild Daily” from Axel Springer, “Life Hacks,” “NewsStories”, and “Claudia Saves the World” from Burda, and “Superluminar – Das Social Wissensformat” as well as some other shows from G+J.
Doub said these partnerships communicate Facebook Watch’s “support for the news industry in Europe.”

Google: Publishers Lose Half of Ad Revenue From Cookie Blocking
Digital publishers lose approximately 52% of revenue when users block cookies, the data that tracks users’ online searches, according to a Google study.

News publishers lose 62% since cookie-blocking handicaps advertisers from reaching their target audience. Google discovered this by measuring the impact of cookie blocking, by running tests with 500 publishers and disabling cookies at random for parts of each publisher’s traffic.

Google created this report since they have major interest in digital advertising since 84% of their revenue is attributed to ad sales.